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Air Traffic Control

Associate of Applied Science Degree

Curriculum Total Credits: 70 (2016-2017 Academic Year)

Air Traffic Control provides training in the application of non-radar/radar air traffic control procedures as well as control tower operator training and experience. CCBC provides students actual tower experience through training within our own student-operated tower.

This program is designed to prepare students aviation subjects related to ATC. The student will obtain flight instruction from one of the College’s approved fixed-based operators, who is also an FAA approved provider.

Associate Degree graduates in Air Traffic Control may look forward to a career as an air traffic control specialist with the federal government, private industry, or military services.  Additional opportunities exist in rapidly expanding fields of general and commercial aviation.

Prerequisites to entering the program include a current second-class medical certificate for ATC and no speech impediments. Contact the Aviation Sciences Division or your family physician for referral to a flight surgeon (aviation physician) in your locality. Physicians must be approved by the FAA in order to administer the required medical certificate. A person with a waiver for a medical certificate is required to consult with the Aviation Sciences division.  

Based on the size of the incoming class of ATC students, it may be necessary to divide the incoming class into 2 sub-groups and use the simultaneous 2-track flow system. If the 2-track flow system is used, the students will be ranked based on their 1st semester performance in the AVIC235 Air Traffic Control Procedures course. Students will then make a track selection between Option A or Option B program flow until successful completion of degree requirements. In accordance with college policy, military veterans are provided first opportunity for course/track selections.

Program Outcomes:

Graduates will be able to

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of air traffic control procedures.
  2. Demonstrate the ability to label a ZAE airspace map and perform responsibilities of the radar and radar associate positions in the radar simulation lab.
  3. Demonstrate the ability to label a Pittsburgh airspace video map including sectored airspace with altitudes and frequencies along with demonstrating the ability to control moderate levels of air traffic both in the radar simulation lab and the live environment in the air traffic control tower.

Option A

Curriculum

FIRST YEAR

First Semester - 15 Credits

CodeTitleCredits
AVIC 235Air Traffic Control Procedures 3.00
AVIP 108Flight Lab I 2.00
AVIP 110Flight Theory 4.00
AVIP 123Aeronautical Knowledge 3.00
MATH 130College Algebra 3.00

Second Semester - 17 Credits

CodeTitleCredits
AVIC 237Facility Rating I 5.00
AVIC 247Approach Control I 4.00
AVIP 109Flight Lab II 1.00
AVIP 121Aviation Meteorology 3.00
AVIP 136Theory of Instrument Flight 4.00

Third Semester - 12 Credits

CodeTitleCredits
AVIC 238Facility Rating II 5.00
AVIC 248Approach Control II 4.00
WRIT 101English Composition 3.00

SECOND YEAR

Fourth Semester - 14 Credits

CodeTitleCredits
AVIC 251Non-Radar Lab 5.00
AVIP 101History of Aviation 3.00
AVIC 260ATC Internship 3.00
 Or 
CIST 100Introduction to Information Tech 3.00
AVIC 257Non-Radar Lecture 3.00

Fifth Semester - 12 Credits

CodeTitleCredits
AVIC 258Radar Lecture 4.00
AVIC 256Radar Lab 5.00
LITR 210Concepts of Literature 3.00

Option B

Curriculum

FIRST YEAR

First Semester - 15 Credits

CodeTitleCredits
AVIC 235Air Traffic Control Procedures 3.00
AVIP 108Flight Lab I 2.00
AVIP 110Flight Theory 4.00
AVIP 123Aeronautical Knowledge 3.00
MATH 130College Algebra 3.00

Second Semester - 16 Credits

CodeTitleCredits
AVIC 257Non-Radar Lecture 3.00
AVIC 251Non-Radar Lab 5.00
AVIP 109Flight Lab II 1.00
AVIP 121Aviation Meteorology 3.00
AVIP 136Theory of Instrument Flight 4.00

Third Semester- 12 Credits

CodeTitleCredits
AVIC 258Radar Lecture 4.00
AVIC 256Radar Lab 5.00
WRIT 101English Composition 3.00

SECOND YEAR

Fourth Semester - 12 Credits

CodeTitleCredits
AVIC 237Facility Rating I 5.00
AVIC 247Approach Control I 4.00
AVIP 101History of Aviation 3.00

Fifth Semester - 15 Credits

CodeTitleCredits
AVIC 238Facility Rating II 5.00
AVIC 248Approach Control II 4.00
AVIC 260ATC Internship 3.00
 OR 
CIST 100Introduction to Information Tech 3.00
LITR 210Concepts of Literature 3.00

Course Descriptions

AVIC 235 - Air Traffic Control Procedures

Procedures for conducting control of air traffic are emphasized. Procedural use of regulations and basic air traffic control procedures are covered, such as aviation terms, definitions and abbreviations; general procedures; weather information; radio communications including proper phraseology and descriptions; altimetry; flight progress strips and their markings; abbreviations and symbols; airport traffic control procedures; instrument operations; special VFR procedures; radar operations and emergency procedures. 3-0-3

AVIP 108 - Flight Lab I

This course includes the actual flying experience with a CCBC approved fixed base operator. Students will receive a minimum of 25 hours of flight instruction including dual, solo and briefings. Successful completion will be the Phase 2 check in the coursebooks at the flight school in pursuit of the Private/Recreational Pilot Airplane Certificate (no limitations). Students are required to have a valid second class medical certificate to enroll in this course. Persons wishing to receive credit for previous flight time must make arrangements with the CCBC Aviation Sciences Division Director or the coordinator of the aviation program.

AVIP 110 - Flight Theory

The principles of flight, basics of air traffic control, weather facts, navigational procedures and airplane operations as pertinent to the Private/Recreational Pilot Certificate are studied. Upon successful completion of this course,(as defined by a grade of 80% or better) the student will receive an endorsement to take the FAA knowledge exam in the department for an additional fee. 4-0-4 Corequisite: AVIP123

AVIP 123 - Aeronautical Knowledge

This course is designed to provide the basis for Air Traffic Control Training. The student will learn the language of air traffic controllers, and will become familiar with the operating principles of navigational equipment pertinent to pilots and controllers. 3-0-3 Corequisite: AVIP110

MATH 130 - College Algebra

The functional approach to algebra is stressed with attention to the properties of the real number system; linear functions and equations; exponents; radicals; functions; systems of equations; complex numbers; and quadratic equations. Additional topics may be added at the discretion of the instructor. Prerequisite: "C" or better in PREP021, appropriate placement score or appropriate high school records. 3-0-3

AVIC 237 - Facility Rating I

The student receives actual on-the-job training in an operational air traffic control tower. Training includes area and airport familiarization, proper microphone technique and phraseology, the control management of aircraft on the airport, posting and relay of flight data and aviation weather information. Supervised by experienced and certified air traffic controllers throughout the training process, the student is provided an ideal environment for transition from classroom theory to the practical application of air traffic control procedures. Pre-Requisites: Pass the FAA Control Tower Operator Written examination, have a current Second Class Airman's Medical Certificate and successful completion of AVIP110, AVIP123 and AVIC235. 0-10-5 Corequisite: AVIC237

AVIC 247 - Approach Control I

This course addresses the theory and basic applications of radar air traffic control services provided by approach control facilities within the general vicinity of controlled airports. Initially, each aspect of approach control equipment and operations will be discussed from the viewpoint of the practical application. During the later stages of the course, students participate in simulated exercises designed to develop basic skills in the applications of air traffic control procedures in an integrated multipostition-facility. 0-8-4 Prerequisite: AVIP110, AVIP123 and AVIC235. Also, a current second class medical certificate. Corequisite: AVIC237

AVIP 109 - Flight Lab II

This course includes the actual flying experience with a CCBC approved fixed base operator. Students will receive a minimum of 15 hours of flight instruction including dual, solo and briefings. Successful completion will be the Phase 3 check in the coursebooks at the flight school plus completion of the Private/Recreational Pilot Airplane Certificate (no limitations). Students are required to have valid second class medical certificate to enroll in this course. Persons wishing to receive credit for previous flight time must make arrrangements with the CCBC Aviation Sciences Division Director or the coordinator of the aviation program.

AVIP 121 - Aviation Meteorology

This course places special emphasis on interpretation of meteorology phenomena affecting aircraft; basic concepts of aviation meteorology; temperature, pressure, moisture, stability, clouds, air masses, fronts, thunderstorms, icing and fog. The course covers analysis and use of weather data for flight planning and safe flying; interpretation of weather maps, reports and forecasts. 3-0-3 Prerequisite: AVIP110/123 Corequisite: AVIP136

AVIP 136 - Theory of Instrument Flight

This course includes basic radio fundamentals as used by instrument pilot and the air traffic controller. A description and practical use of various radio aids to safe aerial navigation, including VOR, ILS, ADF, GPS and others are taught. Instrument charts and instrument approach charts are adapted to radio navigation and the application of the Aeronautical Information Manual is studied. Upon successful completion of this course (as defined by a grade of 80% or better), the student will receive an endorsement to take the FAA knowledge exam in the department for an additional fee. 4-0-4 Pre-Requisite: Successful completion of AVIP110/AVIP123

AVIC 238 - Facility Rating II

This course is a continuance of Facility Rating I. The student receives actual on-the-job training in the provision of advanced airport traffic control services and procedures. Successful completion of this course is a demonstration by the student that he/she is capable of providing all required air traffic control services during normal Beaver County Airport traffic conditions with minimal assistance from instructor personnel. Pre-Requisites: Successful completion of AVIC237, AVIC247 and a current second class airman's Medical Certificate for ATC is required. 0-10-5 Corequisite: AVIC248

AVIC 248 - Approach Control II

This is a continuation of AVIC247. After an intitial review of the subjects addressed during the preceding semester, students participate in simulated air traffic control exercises designed to develop more advanced skill levels in the application of air traffic control procedures pertinent to approach control facility operations. The exercises increase in complexity as the semester progresses. Throughout the course, student performance is evaluated by FAA rated air traffic control instructors. 0-8-4 Prerequisite: Successful completion of ALL required AVIC247, AVIC237 and a current Second Class Medical Certificate. Corequisite: AVIC238

WRIT 101 - English Composition

Students will practice expository writing and learn the academic form of the essay and research paper. Students will focus on the development of an academically sound and challenging thesis and resulting essay. The mechanics of writing will be reviewed as needed. 3-0-3 Pre-requisite: Placement testing; successful completion of DEVS012 Reading and DEVS015 Introduction to College Writing if required, permission of the Division Director.

AVIC 251 - Non-Radar Lab

Designed specifically for students who desire to become air traffic controllers for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), this course addresses the basic application of Air Route Traffic Control Center procedures in a simulated non-radar ATC environment. Included are strip marking methods and procedures, coordination requirements and phraseology, and the practical application on non-radar separation rules. 0-10-5 Prerequisite: Successful completion of AVIP110, AVIP123 and AVIC235. A second class medical certificate is required. Co-Requisite: AVIC257 - Non-Radar Lecture

AVIP 101 - History of Aviation

The Introduction to Aviation course is designed to give the student a solid foundation in understanding where aviation came from starting from the earliest myths and legends through actual developments in flight systems and ultimately to a vision to where aviation may lead us. The course will begin with a history of flight followed by a study of the atmospheric medium in which aircraft of all types operate. The students will next learn about the infrastructure supporting aviation, i.e. airports, aviation organizations and types of aircraft. The students will be expected to recognize the differences between aircraft and identify them by sight. This will be followed by more specific issues such as aviation weather and the challenges weather pose to flight activities as well as a technological look at just what makes them fly and how they are propelled and controlled and how they get from point A to point B. The course will end with a broad review of the different career fields available withing the aerospace industrial sector and their future prospects, i.e. professional pilot, air traffic control, aerospace management and unmanned aerial vehicles. 3-0-3

AVIC 260 - ATC Internship

This course is designed to give the ATC student a supervised on the job experience in various aspects of the air traffic control environment. Students will spend a minimum of one hundred and thirty five hours (135) at a FAA terminal or field facility observing and participating in airport/approach/departure/satellite/ enroute/nonradar and radar air traffic control operations. The student will complete a daily journal and three page summary of the experience. This course will fulfill the requirement of the ATC curriculum general education elective. 0-9-3 Prerequisites: Successful completion of AVIC236, Advanced ATC, and recommendation by the ATC Coordinator. Recommendation will be based on GPA, attendance, and demonstration of performance in the ATC curriculum. Students will have successfully completed 15 credits in ATC major, QPA of at least 3.0, sophomore status 30 total credits completed.

CIST 100 - Introduction to Information Tech

A computer course designed to introduce students to personal computers. Topics include basic concepts of computer operations, storage media, software categories, Windows operating system, computer communication devices, and Internet. The course also includes introduction to Microsoft Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint. 3-0-3

AVIC 257 - Non-Radar Lecture

Designed specifically for students who desire to become air traffic controllers for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). This course addresses the theory and mechanics of Air Route Traffic Control Center for non-radar procedures. Included are airspace enrivonment, strip preparation, strip marking methods and procedures, coordination requirements and phraseology, and separation rules used in the enroute ATC environment. Prerequisites: Successful completion of all required AVIP110, AVIP123, AVIC235 and a current Second Class Medical Certificate. 3-0-3 Co-Requisite: AVIC251 Non-Radar Lab

AVIC 258 - Radar Lecture

Designed specifically for students who desire to become air traffic controllers for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). This course addresses the theory and mechanics of enroute (Air Route Traffic Control Center) radar procedures and builds upon the previous semester non-radar material. Included are airspace environment, strip marking methods and procedures, coordination requirements and phraseology, and separation rules used in the enroute ATC environment. Prerequisites: Successful completion of AVIC257 and AVIC251 and a current Second Class Medical Certificate for ATC is requireed. Co-Requisite: AVIC256 Radar Lab 4-0-4

AVIC 256 - Radar Lab

After initial review of the subjects addressed in the preceding semesters, students will participate in simulated en-route air traffic control exercises designed to develop advanced skills in the application of procedures pertinent to en-route facility operations. The exercises will increase in both volume and complexity as the semester progresses. Throughout the course, student performance is evaluated by the instructors. 0-10-5 Prerequisite: Successful completion of ALL required AVIC257, AVIC251, current Second Class Medical Certificate. Co-Requisite: AVIC258 Radar Lecture

LITR 210 - Concepts of Literature

This course introduces students to the three major forms of literary expression: fiction, poetry, and drama. Significant works from each form will be analyzed to reveal creative techniques, how they represent an author’s time, and how they reflect today’s human condition. Prerequisite: WRIT101 or permission of the department.

AVIC 235 - Air Traffic Control Procedures

Procedures for conducting control of air traffic are emphasized. Procedural use of regulations and basic air traffic control procedures are covered, such as aviation terms, definitions and abbreviations; general procedures; weather information; radio communications including proper phraseology and descriptions; altimetry; flight progress strips and their markings; abbreviations and symbols; airport traffic control procedures; instrument operations; special VFR procedures; radar operations and emergency procedures. 3-0-3

AVIP 108 - Flight Lab I

This course includes the actual flying experience with a CCBC approved fixed base operator. Students will receive a minimum of 25 hours of flight instruction including dual, solo and briefings. Successful completion will be the Phase 2 check in the coursebooks at the flight school in pursuit of the Private/Recreational Pilot Airplane Certificate (no limitations). Students are required to have a valid second class medical certificate to enroll in this course. Persons wishing to receive credit for previous flight time must make arrangements with the CCBC Aviation Sciences Division Director or the coordinator of the aviation program.

AVIP 110 - Flight Theory

The principles of flight, basics of air traffic control, weather facts, navigational procedures and airplane operations as pertinent to the Private/Recreational Pilot Certificate are studied. Upon successful completion of this course,(as defined by a grade of 80% or better) the student will receive an endorsement to take the FAA knowledge exam in the department for an additional fee. 4-0-4 Corequisite: AVIP123

AVIP 123 - Aeronautical Knowledge

This course is designed to provide the basis for Air Traffic Control Training. The student will learn the language of air traffic controllers, and will become familiar with the operating principles of navigational equipment pertinent to pilots and controllers. 3-0-3 Corequisite: AVIP110

MATH 130 - College Algebra

The functional approach to algebra is stressed with attention to the properties of the real number system; linear functions and equations; exponents; radicals; functions; systems of equations; complex numbers; and quadratic equations. Additional topics may be added at the discretion of the instructor. Prerequisite: "C" or better in PREP021, appropriate placement score or appropriate high school records. 3-0-3

AVIC 257 - Non-Radar Lecture

Designed specifically for students who desire to become air traffic controllers for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). This course addresses the theory and mechanics of Air Route Traffic Control Center for non-radar procedures. Included are airspace enrivonment, strip preparation, strip marking methods and procedures, coordination requirements and phraseology, and separation rules used in the enroute ATC environment. Prerequisites: Successful completion of all required AVIP110, AVIP123, AVIC235 and a current Second Class Medical Certificate. 3-0-3 Co-Requisite: AVIC251 Non-Radar Lab

AVIC 251 - Non-Radar Lab

Designed specifically for students who desire to become air traffic controllers for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), this course addresses the basic application of Air Route Traffic Control Center procedures in a simulated non-radar ATC environment. Included are strip marking methods and procedures, coordination requirements and phraseology, and the practical application on non-radar separation rules. 0-10-5 Prerequisite: Successful completion of AVIP110, AVIP123 and AVIC235. A second class medical certificate is required. Co-Requisite: AVIC257 - Non-Radar Lecture

AVIP 109 - Flight Lab II

This course includes the actual flying experience with a CCBC approved fixed base operator. Students will receive a minimum of 15 hours of flight instruction including dual, solo and briefings. Successful completion will be the Phase 3 check in the coursebooks at the flight school plus completion of the Private/Recreational Pilot Airplane Certificate (no limitations). Students are required to have valid second class medical certificate to enroll in this course. Persons wishing to receive credit for previous flight time must make arrrangements with the CCBC Aviation Sciences Division Director or the coordinator of the aviation program.

AVIP 121 - Aviation Meteorology

This course places special emphasis on interpretation of meteorology phenomena affecting aircraft; basic concepts of aviation meteorology; temperature, pressure, moisture, stability, clouds, air masses, fronts, thunderstorms, icing and fog. The course covers analysis and use of weather data for flight planning and safe flying; interpretation of weather maps, reports and forecasts. 3-0-3 Prerequisite: AVIP110/123 Corequisite: AVIP136

AVIP 136 - Theory of Instrument Flight

This course includes basic radio fundamentals as used by instrument pilot and the air traffic controller. A description and practical use of various radio aids to safe aerial navigation, including VOR, ILS, ADF, GPS and others are taught. Instrument charts and instrument approach charts are adapted to radio navigation and the application of the Aeronautical Information Manual is studied. Upon successful completion of this course (as defined by a grade of 80% or better), the student will receive an endorsement to take the FAA knowledge exam in the department for an additional fee. 4-0-4 Pre-Requisite: Successful completion of AVIP110/AVIP123

AVIC 258 - Radar Lecture

Designed specifically for students who desire to become air traffic controllers for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). This course addresses the theory and mechanics of enroute (Air Route Traffic Control Center) radar procedures and builds upon the previous semester non-radar material. Included are airspace environment, strip marking methods and procedures, coordination requirements and phraseology, and separation rules used in the enroute ATC environment. Prerequisites: Successful completion of AVIC257 and AVIC251 and a current Second Class Medical Certificate for ATC is requireed. Co-Requisite: AVIC256 Radar Lab 4-0-4

AVIC 256 - Radar Lab

After initial review of the subjects addressed in the preceding semesters, students will participate in simulated en-route air traffic control exercises designed to develop advanced skills in the application of procedures pertinent to en-route facility operations. The exercises will increase in both volume and complexity as the semester progresses. Throughout the course, student performance is evaluated by the instructors. 0-10-5 Prerequisite: Successful completion of ALL required AVIC257, AVIC251, current Second Class Medical Certificate. Co-Requisite: AVIC258 Radar Lecture

WRIT 101 - English Composition

Students will practice expository writing and learn the academic form of the essay and research paper. Students will focus on the development of an academically sound and challenging thesis and resulting essay. The mechanics of writing will be reviewed as needed. 3-0-3 Pre-requisite: Placement testing; successful completion of DEVS012 Reading and DEVS015 Introduction to College Writing if required, permission of the Division Director.

AVIC 237 - Facility Rating I

The student receives actual on-the-job training in an operational air traffic control tower. Training includes area and airport familiarization, proper microphone technique and phraseology, the control management of aircraft on the airport, posting and relay of flight data and aviation weather information. Supervised by experienced and certified air traffic controllers throughout the training process, the student is provided an ideal environment for transition from classroom theory to the practical application of air traffic control procedures. Pre-Requisites: Pass the FAA Control Tower Operator Written examination, have a current Second Class Airman's Medical Certificate and successful completion of AVIP110, AVIP123 and AVIC235. 0-10-5 Corequisite: AVIC237

AVIC 247 - Approach Control I

This course addresses the theory and basic applications of radar air traffic control services provided by approach control facilities within the general vicinity of controlled airports. Initially, each aspect of approach control equipment and operations will be discussed from the viewpoint of the practical application. During the later stages of the course, students participate in simulated exercises designed to develop basic skills in the applications of air traffic control procedures in an integrated multipostition-facility. 0-8-4 Prerequisite: AVIP110, AVIP123 and AVIC235. Also, a current second class medical certificate. Corequisite: AVIC237

AVIP 101 - History of Aviation

The Introduction to Aviation course is designed to give the student a solid foundation in understanding where aviation came from starting from the earliest myths and legends through actual developments in flight systems and ultimately to a vision to where aviation may lead us. The course will begin with a history of flight followed by a study of the atmospheric medium in which aircraft of all types operate. The students will next learn about the infrastructure supporting aviation, i.e. airports, aviation organizations and types of aircraft. The students will be expected to recognize the differences between aircraft and identify them by sight. This will be followed by more specific issues such as aviation weather and the challenges weather pose to flight activities as well as a technological look at just what makes them fly and how they are propelled and controlled and how they get from point A to point B. The course will end with a broad review of the different career fields available withing the aerospace industrial sector and their future prospects, i.e. professional pilot, air traffic control, aerospace management and unmanned aerial vehicles. 3-0-3

AVIC 238 - Facility Rating II

This course is a continuance of Facility Rating I. The student receives actual on-the-job training in the provision of advanced airport traffic control services and procedures. Successful completion of this course is a demonstration by the student that he/she is capable of providing all required air traffic control services during normal Beaver County Airport traffic conditions with minimal assistance from instructor personnel. Pre-Requisites: Successful completion of AVIC237, AVIC247 and a current second class airman's Medical Certificate for ATC is required. 0-10-5 Corequisite: AVIC248

AVIC 248 - Approach Control II

This is a continuation of AVIC247. After an intitial review of the subjects addressed during the preceding semester, students participate in simulated air traffic control exercises designed to develop more advanced skill levels in the application of air traffic control procedures pertinent to approach control facility operations. The exercises increase in complexity as the semester progresses. Throughout the course, student performance is evaluated by FAA rated air traffic control instructors. 0-8-4 Prerequisite: Successful completion of ALL required AVIC247, AVIC237 and a current Second Class Medical Certificate. Corequisite: AVIC238

AVIC 260 - ATC Internship

This course is designed to give the ATC student a supervised on the job experience in various aspects of the air traffic control environment. Students will spend a minimum of one hundred and thirty five hours (135) at a FAA terminal or field facility observing and participating in airport/approach/departure/satellite/ enroute/nonradar and radar air traffic control operations. The student will complete a daily journal and three page summary of the experience. This course will fulfill the requirement of the ATC curriculum general education elective. 0-9-3 Prerequisites: Successful completion of AVIC236, Advanced ATC, and recommendation by the ATC Coordinator. Recommendation will be based on GPA, attendance, and demonstration of performance in the ATC curriculum. Students will have successfully completed 15 credits in ATC major, QPA of at least 3.0, sophomore status 30 total credits completed.

CIST 100 - Introduction to Information Tech

A computer course designed to introduce students to personal computers. Topics include basic concepts of computer operations, storage media, software categories, Windows operating system, computer communication devices, and Internet. The course also includes introduction to Microsoft Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint. 3-0-3

LITR 210 - Concepts of Literature

This course introduces students to the three major forms of literary expression: fiction, poetry, and drama. Significant works from each form will be analyzed to reveal creative techniques, how they represent an author’s time, and how they reflect today’s human condition. Prerequisite: WRIT101 or permission of the department.